Why Creating a False Sense of Demand is Bad for Business

Why Creating a False Sense of Demand is Bad for Business | BlissandFaith.com

The difference between marketing and being gimmicky

I know at some point you’ve seen people do this; create a false sense of demand to sell their product or service. It rarely works, and if anything comes across as scammy, gimmicky, and even braggadocios. If you have a quality product or service, I’ll be the first to say that you don’t need to do this.

The demand will be there because your product or service will speak for itself.

This is especially important when you’re selling products and services online because people are bombarded with enough ads, pitches, and other marketing ploys when they land on sites. It’s extremely off-putting to land on someone’s site and see plastered on every page and post this false sense of demand for their product or service.

Genuine demand is not scammy

What has to be understood is that things online work the same as they work offline, its the same people and people are smart. If there’s a real sense of demand, you won’t see an individual creating it. They may mention that their product or service is sold out or close to being sold out, or that they have many upcoming projects, but you won’t see them gloating about how many they’ve sold or how booked solid they are. Whenever I see individuals do this, it automatically comes across as inauthentic and distrusting.  I feel like they’re trying to get over on me and that’s an insult. There is a difference between marketing and being scammy.

For example, when I released my Blog to Success Planner, I stated that the $3.50 price was a limited time introductory discounted price. However, you never heard me say “hundreds are buying it, and you should too!” My rationale is that if someone likes the product and they don’t get around to buying it when it’s on sale, they will still purchase it later at full price. I’ve done it myself and I’ve seen it happen time and time again.

I worked in retail for many, many years and I know this to be true from first-hand experience.  It may not necessary generate revenue right then and there, but it catches people’s eyes and if anything they at least check out the product.  Kind of like window shopping.  The one thing you’ll notice respectable businesses and brands not doing is talking about x-amount of people who have already bought the product or throwing out other arbitrary numbers about it.

Superlative language suggests inauthenticity

Now, sparingly you may see “over a million bought” or “our customer’s favorite”, and the company can legitimately back up these claims with actual numbers, facts, advertisements, etc. about the product.  This typically and usually works for very large brands, in that its more believable that what’s being said is actually true about the product or service.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with putting “what our customers are loving” or “our most popular package”, letting potential clients and customers know what products or services are most selected or purchased.  This isn’t gloating, but simply stating the facts.

Your customer will see through it all

You have to keep in mind that there is a definite line between stating exactly what is true and just making up false claims about your product or service to generate business.  People will soon see through those false claims, and you will loose their trust. Trust is everything when it comes to running a business, and if people feel as if they can’t trust you, they won’t support you.

If you’re a relatively new business owner, freelancer, or entrepreneur make sure you take the time out and examine exactly what you’re conveying to your potential clients and customers.

You never want to come across as self-serving or as if everything is about you and your brand. If you don’t already know, one of the first rules of business is that it’s not about you. You’re providing a product or service to people, so it’s about them. Make sure that all parts of your business represent that. This is especially important for those of us that blog about or for our businesses.

If you don’t already know, one of the first rules of business is that it’s not about you.

You’re providing a product or service to people, so it’s about them. Make sure that all parts of your business represent that. This is especially important for those of us that blog about or for our businesses.

Remember that everything you say, even on a somewhat informal platform as a blog says a lot about who you are and the type of business owner that you also are.  I’ve seen many make this mistake all too often, and it never fails that they continue to make it and that they don’t garner the success they could because of it.  Trust and success go hand in hand, if people trust you they will support

Trust and success go hand in hand; if people trust you they will support and promote you!

Make sure you’re always putting yourself and business in this type of position.  When you do, the demand, success, business, and profits will come!

I’d love to hear your take! – Have you ever come across a business or brand who appeared to be creating a false demand for their product or service?  Was it off-putting?  Did you still support them?
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3 thoughts on “Why Creating a False Sense of Demand is Bad for Business

  1. So interesting. I know that photographers love to say, “Book now – it’s filling up!” Even if it’s not. And there are times my photography business is booming, and other times – like in the dead of winter – that people aren’t feeling it. That’s ok – I just find other ways to make money then.
    I guess it’s a bit of a turnoff, but as a business owner, I suppose I see it a lot.

    1. I understand exactly what you mean Tamara! It never fails that you see it most in the freelancing/service based industry. I’m sure many don’t have bad intentions when they’re doing it, but many times it comes across as scammy. This time of the year is always slow and seems to be that ways for many of us. I’m happy to know that you brainstorm and find other ways of drawing income. I’ve had to do the same myself lately!

  2. […] spoke a bit about this in my False Demand post, but more specifically speaking let your skills speak for themselves.  You don’t need […]

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